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Generation, Ascent and Eruption of Magma on the Moon: New Insights Into Emplacement Processes and Landforms

Author: 
James Head
Topic: 
Geology
Delivered As: 
Oral
Abstract Text: 

We utilize a theoretical analysis of the generation, ascent, intrusion and eruption of basaltic magma on the Moon to develop new insights into magma source transport and emplacement mechanisms via dike intrusions, and effusive and explosive eruptions. The volume of magma released in a single event is likely to lie in the range 102 km3 to 103 km3, corresponding to dikes with widths of 40-100 m and both vertical and horizontal extents of 60-100 km, favoring eruption on the lunar nearside. Lunar dike propagation velocities are typically sufficiently high that shallow sill formation is not favored; local low-density breccia zones beneath impact crater floors may cause lateral magma migration to form laccoliths (e.g., Vitello Crater) and sills (e.g., Humboldt Crater) in floor-fractured craters. Shallow crustal dikes may stall and produce crater chains due to active and passive gas venting (e.g., Mendeleev Crater Chain) or may create a near-surface stress field that forms linear and arcuate graben, often with pyroclastic and small-scale effusive eruptions (e.g., Rima Parry V). Effusive eruptions are modulated by effusion rates, eruption durations, cooling and supply limitations to flow length, and pre-existing topography. Relatively low effusion rate, cooling-limited flows lead to small shield volcanoes (e.g., Tobias Mayer, Milicius); higher effusion rate, cooling-limited flows lead to compound flow fields and even higher effusion rate, long-duration flows lead to vent thermal erosion, effusion rate enhancement, and substrate thermal erosion to produce sinuous rilles (e.g., Rimae Prinz). Extremely high effusion rate flows on slopes lead to volume-limited flow with lengths of many hundreds of kilometers (e.g., the young Imbrium flows). Explosive, pyroclastic eruptions are common on the Moon. The low-pressure environment in propagating dike crack-tips can cause gas formation at great depths and throughout dike ascent; at shallow crustal depths both the smelting reaction and magmatic volatiles contribute to significant shallow degassing and pyroclastic activity.

Co-Authors: 
P. Metgzer (UCF), S. Covey (DSI), S. Wiggins (UCF)
SSERVI Identifier: 
NESF2016-060

About SSERVI
Recognizing that science and human exploration are mutually enabling, NASA created the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) to address basic and applied scientific questions fundamental to understanding the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids, the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, and the near space environments of these target bodies. As a virtual institute, SSERVI funds investigators at a broad range of domestic institutions, bringing them together along with international partners via virtual technology to enable new scientific efforts."